General Assemblies: What's the Deal?​

General Assemblies happen twice a year (Fall Assembly  & Winter Assembly). The DSU follows Robert's Rules Of Order which is a set of rules developed for deliberative assemblies like ours.

 

Here are the basic elements of Robert's Rules, used by most organizations:

 

1. Motion: To introduce a new piece of business or propose a decision or action, a motion must be made by a group member ("I move that......") A second motion must then also be made (raise your hand and say, "I second it.") After limited discussion the group then votes on the motion. A majority vote is required for the motion to pass (or quorum (50+1) as specified in your bylaws.)

 

2. Postpone Indefinitely: This tactic is used to kill a motion. When passed, the motion cannot be reintroduced at that meeting. It may be brought up again at a later date. This is made as a motion ("I move to postpone indefinitely..."). A second is required. A majority vote is required to postpone the motion under consideration.

 

3. Amend: This is the process used to change a motion under consideration. Perhaps you like the idea proposed but not exactly as offered. Raise your hand and make the following motion: "I move to amend the motion on the floor." This also requires a second. After the motion to amend is seconded, a majority vote is needed to decide whether the amendment is accepted. Then a vote is taken on the amended motion. In some organizations, a "friendly amendment" is made. If the person who made the original motion agrees with the suggested changes, the amended motion may be voted on without a separate vote to approve the amendment.

 

4. Commit: This is used to place a motion in committee. It requires a second. A majority vote must rule to carry it. At the next meeting, the committee is required to prepare a report on the motion committed. If an appropriate committee exists, the motion goes to that committee. If not, a new committee is established.

 

5. Question: To end a debate immediately, the question is called (say "I call the question") and needs a second. A vote is held immediately (no further discussion is allowed). A two-thirds vote is required for passage. If it is passed, the motion on the floor is voted on immediately.

 

6. Table: To table a discussion is to lay aside the business at hand in such a manner that it will be considered later in the meeting or at another time ("I make a motion to table this discussion until the next meeting. In the meantime, we will get more information so we can better discuss the issue.") A second is needed and a majority vote required to table the item being discussed.

 

7. Adjourn: A motion is made to end the meeting. A second motion is required. A majority vote is then required for the meeting to be adjourned (ended).

 

Note: If more than one motion is proposed, the most recent takes precedence over the ones preceding it. For example if #6, a motion to table the discussion, is proposed, it must be voted on before #3, a motion to amend, can be decided.

 

In a smaller meeting, like a committee or board meeting, often only four motions are used:

· To introduce (motion.)

· To change a motion (amend.)

· To adopt (accept a report without discussion.)

· To adjourn (end the meeting.)

 

Remember, these processes are designed to ensure that everyone has a chance to participate and to share ideas in an orderly manner & should not be used to prevent discussion of important issues.

CONTACT  US

 

514-931-8731  EXT. 1114

3040 Sherbrooke West, Montreal QC H3Z 1A4

Office: 2F.2